RFID technology being introduced to Australian rubbish causes residents to worry about privacy

News.com.au reported, recently, residents of the Sydney Nevada were surprised to find that the local city government had begun to replace the trash can. When they took out the trash, they found a lot of “raw faces”.

However, what’s more surprising, these trash bins is also introduced the “black technology”! City concil even installed a monitoring device in the trash can!

It is reported that the Sydney West Municipal Government has currently replaced 35,000 new trash cans. At the edge of these new trash cans, a very small, rounded device was installed in a very subtle place. This circular device is called a radio frequency identification device or an RFID tag. As above picture shows, you won’t think it a monitoring device.

A spokesman for the Sydney West concord said that the device would be the standard equipment for “mobile trash can”. The purpose of installing this black technology is to “certify”. In other words,  if people who pollute the trash, will soon be checked out. You can not just dump the garbage in Australia. You must pour the trash into the recycling trash can, not the ordinary ones, and there is corresponding fine measure.

However, the privacy problems caused by it also make the Australian residents uneasy. Although many commercial enterprises have already used this rfid waste management technology, but in the absence of transparency, residents are likely to lose their sense of security. University of New South Wales Bachelor of Network Law said that he understood residents’ concerns. Because this will make all the things in people’s lives are clear and open, and people will worry about excessive reaction in the case of lacking transparency. And according to his speculation, at the beginning, these monitoring information data authority will be very strict. But over time, these data will be used for other purposes, such as infer whether home users are on vacation, because they don’t have garbage to pour.

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